TRPA1 and TRPV1 in Airway Chemosensation and Reflex Control

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Related website link http://physiologyonline.physiology.org/content/23/6/360
Description Trigeminal chemosensory nerve endings in the nasal mucosa are in the first line of defense against noxious chemical challenges.
Abstract New studies have revealed an essential role for TRPA1, a sensory neuronal TRP ion channel, in airway chemosensation and inflammation. TRPA1 is activated by chlorine, reactive oxygen species, and noxious constituents of smoke and smog, initiating irritation and airway reflex responses. Together with TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, TRPA1 may contribute to chemical hypersensitivity, chronic cough, and airway inflammation in asthma, COPD, and reactive airway dysfunction syndrome.

Trigeminal chemosensory nerve endings in the nasal mucosa are in the first line of defense against noxious chemical challenges. Trigeminal excitation initiates the sensation of irritation and pain and sneezing (10). Sensory-autonomic parasympathetic efferent reflex pathways induce secretions from nasal, lacrimatory, and salivary glands, and the dilation of vessels in the nasal mucosa and sinuses. Neuropeptides such as substance P and CGRP, released from chemically stimulated nerve endings, promote neurogenic inflammatory vasodilation and leakage, contributing to narrowing or obstruction of the nasal passages.
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